The New York Times: Voter Registration Deadlines, State by State

Election Day is Nov. 8. But the vast majority of the 50 states do not allow voters to register that day. Here’s a rundown of the deadlines to register by state.

The “mail” dates refer to the day by which an application must be postmarked. States that offer registration on Election Day often have special requirements. On a desktop computer, you may search for your state’s name with keyboard shortcuts: Ctrl F on a PC or Command F on a Mac.

To see your state's voter registration deadline from The New York Times, please click HERE.

The Week in Review: The Week of September 19, 2016

With the end of the fiscal year and October 1st budget deadline looming, Senate Republicans unveiled a proposed deal yesterday to keep the government funded and pay for important budget priorities. However, Democrats have not yet signaled their support, and the House is waiting for the Senate to act on the Continuing Resolution before it takes action. While the election continues to dominate the headlines, Congress also held a hearing on CAFE Standards, and the administration unveiled new autonomous car guidelines.

Now This is What You Auto Know Now…

How many states have production facilities for international nameplate automakers?

A) 5

B) 12

C) 16

D) 23

E) None of the above

Leave your answer in the comments section and click HERE to see What You Auto Know Now.

GOP Puts Shutdown Squeeze Play on Dems

Democrats and Republicans are battling over whether aid for Flint, Mich., should be included in a government funding bill a week before a possible shutdown.

Republicans on Thursday presented what they said was a clean bill stripped of conservative policy riders, such as language blocking the administration from ceding authority over the internet, which had drawn objections from Democrats.

The bill would provide $500 million in relief to flood victims in Louisiana, West Virginia and Maryland, fund the battle against the Zika virus and provide aid to communities dealing with opioid addition. But it does not include aid for the community of Flint, where residents can’t drink the tap water due to high levels of lead.

Democrats expressed outrage on Thursday and argued the stopgap is not in fact “clean” because of what they see as a politically motivated decision to help some areas of the country while ignoring Flint.

Republicans are trying to put Democrats in a corner.

To read more from The Hill, please click HERE.

Upton: Roll Mpg Rules Back to ‘Reasonable’ Levels

Michigan’s top-ranking congressional Republican called Thursday for federal regulators to roll back a requirement that mandates automakers to achieve a fleetwide average of 54.5 miles-per-gallon for cars and light-duty trucks by 2025.

U.S. House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Fred Upton, R-St. Joseph, said during a hearing on Thursday that the stringent gas mileage rules should be adjusted “to more reasonable and achievable levels” when they come up for a Congress-mandated review in April 2018.

“There is no question that improved vehicle fuel efficiency is a worthy goal, but not if it is reached in a way that harms consumers. With the average cost of a new car at $34,000 and rising, we don’t need any unnecessarily costly Washington mandates,” said Upton.

To read more from The Detroit News, please click HERE.

GOP Mostly Powerless in Stopping Obama 'Midnight' Regulations

Republican lawmakers are bracing for a slew of last-minute rules and regulations, as well as more executive actions to place swaths of land under federal protection, during President Barack Obama's final months in office.

“Midnight regulations” are a feature of any lame-duck administration and represent a president's last opportunity to lock in rules on legacy issues. In many instances, GOP members acknowledge they are powerless to stop him.

Obama first served notice that he'd take such a tack in January 2014, when he vowed to use the legal authorities of the office of the president to act when Congress would not — or could not — do so. “We’re not just going to be waiting for legislation in order to make sure that we’re providing Americans the kind of help they need,” he said then. “I’ve got a pen and I’ve got a phone."

To read more from Roll Call, please click HERE.

In Trade News

Kevin Brady: Trade Deal Ball is in Obama's Court (Texas Tribune)

Finalize the Trans-Pacific Partnership While the Political Window is Still Open (The Los Angeles Times)

Joe Biden Says Chances of Congress Passing the TPP Are Slim (Forbes)

In Auto News

Millennials Want Cars—and Low Payments (Automotive News)

Toyota Spends to Defend Its Pickup Perch (Automotive News)

The Car Brands That Lure the Most Buyers From Other Automakers (Forbes)

Friday Funny

JEB EXCLAMATION POINT!

#WednesdayWisdom: Pop Quiz!

How many states have production facilities for international nameplate automakers?

A) 5

B) 12

C) 16

D) 23

E) None of the above

 

Leave your answer in the comments section and click HERE to see What You Auto Know Now.

The Week in Review: The Week of September 12, 2016

As the country mourned the 15th anniversary of the September 11th attacks on Sunday, Congress returned to D.C. with a full agenda. On Monday, the Senate and the House both returned for the second of three scheduled legislative work weeks in September. The top priority for Congress is to pass a new spending bill to fund the government before the current spending bill expires on October 1. Senate, House, and administration budget negotiators have hinted that they are close to a deal to fund the government through December 9, which would avoid a government shutdown and include $1.1 billion dollars to combat the spread of the Zika virus. Once an agreement is reached both the House and the Senate are expected to act swiftly. No matter how the election in November plays out, the passage of another short term spending measure ensures that Congress will return for another lame duck session.

This Tuesday, September 20th, join AIADA for the first installment of our special Auto Talk Election Series featuring Congressman and auto dealer Mike Kelly.  For more information and to register, please click HERE.

Now THIS is what you Auto Know Now…

In 2015, what percentage of green cars were sold by international automakers?

A) 20%

B) 40%

C) 60%

D) 80%

E) None of the above

Please click HERE to see What You Auto Know Now.

The Kaminsky Column: Think Auto Trade is Rigged? TPP is the Solution

In August, entrepreneur and author Michael Dunne published a piece in Forbes with the headline, “Trump Is Right about One Thing: Auto Trade with Asia Is Rigged, And U.S. Looks like a Dupe.” In it, he writes that America’s automotive trade policies are, “out of whack” and that the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) would in no way improve matters.

As a second-generation auto dealer selling Hondas and Toyotas in Southern California, the article caught my eye.  Dunne is not the first to suggest that U.S. auto trade with Asian nations is unbalanced, but with a presidential election around the corner and TPP hanging in the balance, I felt his views call for a response.

First, Asia is not a country and it has no trade policy. It’s a diverse continent made up of 48 independent nations, some with which we have trade agreements (South Korea, for example), some with which we have pending trade agreements (Japan, Malaysia, Vietnam, Singapore, Brunei, Australia, New Zealand are all part of TPP), and some with which we don’t (China is one). To conflate all of these countries and claim they are sabotaging our good-faith efforts to sell cars is demonstrably false.

To read more from AIADA Chairman Greg Kaminsky, visit our website by clicking HERE.

No Spending Deal Yet as Leaders Leave White House Meeting

President Barack Obama and congressional leaders appeared confident they soon will ink a deal to avoid a government shutdown, but neither side announced a final agreement on Monday.

Republican and Democratic leaders from both chambers met with Obama for about an hour in the Oval Office in a discussion that covered a wide range of issues. Senior lawmakers and White House aides are signaling that a stopgap funding bill lasting until Dec. 9 could hit the Senate floor later this week.

Obama told reporters he has “modest” hopes that leaders on both sides of Pennsylvania Avenue can find enough common ground to pass a continuing resolution before government funding expires, as well as tack on a section addressing federal efforts to curb the Zika virus outbreak.

“Even though I know that we’re in the midst of a political season and everybody is thinking about elections, there’s still business to be done and I was encouraged by some of the constructive work that’s being done right now,” Obama told reporters in the Oval Office, flanked by House and Senate leaders.

For more from Roll Call, please click HERE.

Hatch: TPP deal can get done in lame-duck session

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch said Wednesday that Congress will pass a sweeping Asia-Pacific trade agreement before the end of the year.

The Utah Republican said he is working with the Obama administration to resolve several lingering issues that could ultimately pave the way for a vote on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) in the lame-duck session after the November elections. 

"I think we're going to get it done in lame-duck," Hatch told The Hill.

First though, the White House needs to calm his concerns over the truncated length of patent protections for high-tech medicines called biologics, Hatch said.

Hatch and other pro-trade Republicans want 12 years of data exclusivity, which is the U.S. standard, whereas the TPP provides up to eight years.

To read more from The Hill, please click HERE.

In Trade News

A Vote Against Trade Is a Vote Against Growth [The Wall Street Journal]

Reichert: President Obama Must Rally Dems Around Pacific Trade Deal  [The Hill]

Why TTIP Failure Would Be Damaging for Barack Obama [Newsweek]

In Auto News

The Battle Between Tesla and Your Neighborhood Car Dealership[The Washington Post]

Toyota’s Carter: Sky Isn’t Falling [Automotive News]

Mercedes Extends Global Luxury Sales Race Lead [Automotive News]

Friday Funny

Thanks, Obama [The Washington Post]

 

#WednesdayWisdom: Pop Quiz!

In 2015, what percentage of green cars were sold by international automakers?

A) 20%

B) 40%

C) 60%

D) 80%

E) None of the above

Leave your answer in the comments section and then click HERE to see What You Auto Know Now.

The Week in Review: The Week of September 5, 2016

After a long, hot summer, Congress returned this week from their August District and State Work Period. District and State Work Periods give Members of Congress and Senators a chance to spend time back home holding townhall meetings, appearing at local events, meeting with constituents, and of course, attending dealer visits. Once they returned, Congressional members began to focus on the issues they were hearing about at home; budget/appropriations issues, Zika funding and trade continue to drive the agenda. The main emphasis over the next month will be on the appropriations legislation that still needs to pass to avoid a government shutdown. However, since it is unlikely all the bills can make it to the President’s desk in time, negotiations have already begun to pass a Continuing Resolution (CR) to keep the government funded until after the election. Once the CR is completed both the House and the Senate will return home for campaigns; a late September or early October departure is normal in an election year. At that point, as November 8th approaches, all eyes will be on the election and what the outcome will bring us. Until then, stick with AIADA to make sure you have everything You Auto Know.

You Auto Know that international nameplate dealers sold this percentage of all U.S. retail vehicle sales in 2015. What is the percentage?

A) 28%

B) 34%

C) 59%

D) 42%

Click HERE to see What You Auto Know Now.

Report: CFPB Faster to Regulate Than Other Agencies

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) pushes out rules more quickly than other federal agencies, according to a new report.

The conservative American Action Forum found that the CFPB’s “pace of rulemaking is 3.5 times faster than that of other significant executive agencies.”

The CFPB has finalized 49 rules since it was founded in July 2011, according to the report, which takes an average of 197 days to complete each.

“The average CFPB rule still moves far faster than the average cabinet agency rulemaking,” Sam Batkins, director of regulatory policy at the American Action Forum, noted in the report.

To read more from The Hill, please click HERE.

On His Way Out, Obama Poised to Act on His Own Again

White House officials see little reason to believe Congress will have a productive run during President Barack Obama’s final months in office, forcing him to issue more executive actions on his way out.

Obama has left little to the imagination when it comes to his willingness to use his authority as president to enact policy changes when lawmakers refuse to act or become too stymied by partisan bickering to pass legislation. Before his final year even began, Obama urged his senior aides to keep searching for ways to get things done — with or without lawmakers’ help.

“I’m not going to rule out additional executive action on the part of the president,” White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest said last month. “What we’ve seen ... is an utterly dysfunctional Congress.”

Translation: Some of Obama’s executive orders and actions could have been avoided had GOP lawmakers pushed legislation he could have signed. Republicans often respond by saying that the president is too liberal to work with on bills they could both support.

So far, Obama has issued 249 executive orders, according to the American Presidency Project at the University of California, Santa Barbara. That’s fewer than George W. Bush’s 291 and Bill Clinton’s 36.

For more from Roll Call, please click HERE.

Will Trump or Clinton Win? The 11 States Deciding the Race

The final sprint toward Election Day has begun, and Donald Trump is reeling in Hillary Clinton’s lead.

A new CNN/ORC poll on Tuesday morning showed Trump leading by 2 points nationally, sending shockwaves through Democratic ranks. Clinton’s advantage in the RealClearPolitics polling average was down to 3.3 points, less than half of what it was at its peak.

For all that, however, the Democratic nominee remains the favorite to win the White House — in part because of her strength in the battleground states that will decide the election.

Clinton has succeeded in making some Republican redoubts competitive, including Georgia and Arizona. But the election will come down to the same states that have decided most recent presidential contests.

The Hill took a look at where things stand in those 11 states. To read more, please click HERE.

In Trade News

Obama Keeps Lame-Duck Hope Alive for Trade Deal [The Hill]

Editorial: Killing the TPP: Not a Long-Term Win for U.S. Labor [Los Angeles Times]

McConnell Comment on TPP Ends Obama's Chance to Close Deal [Roll Call]

In Auto News

Leasing Trend Moves to Used Vehicles [Automotive News]

Women Are Buying More Luxury Vehicles [The Detroit News]

Buyers with Good Credit Turning to Used Cars [CNBC]

Friday Funny

“Tecmo Bo”

#WednesdayWisdom: Pop Quiz!

You Auto Know that international nameplate dealers sold this percentage of all U.S. retail vehicle sales in 2015. What is the percentage?

A) 28%

B) 34%

C) 59%

D) 42%

Leave your answer in the comments section and then click HERE to see What You Auto Know Now.

#WednesdayWisdom: Pop Quiz!

In 2015, how many countries received American-made vehicles from international automakers?

A) 64

B) 110

C) 140

D) None of the above

Leave your answer in the comments section and then click HERE to see What You Auto Know Now.

 

#WednesdayWisdom: Pop Quiz!

What percentage of all U.S. car dealership jobs are created by international nameplate auto dealers?

A) 30%

B) 50%

C) 70%

D) None of the above

Leave your answer in the comments section and then click HERE to see What You Auto Know Now.

The Hill: 5 Things the Olympics Can Teach Us About Trade Policy

We can learn a lot about trade policy by looking at the Summer Olympics.

The largest peacetime gathering of the world, this multination spectacle brings athletes from many countries together every four years to compete across many events, many sports, and many days.

Here are five ways how.

Trade is timeless. Like the Olympics, which dates back to 776 B.C., international trade seems like it has been with us forever. Trade's origins stretch back that far, if not longer. Yet the goods we trade include many of the same kinds of products we traded more than 3,000 years ago. At the same time, like the Olympics, trade constantly brings us innovation. New events in the Olympics appear every four years, while new products and services appear even more frequently. Yet despite this innovation, each Olympiad is inexorably linked back to its predecessors. Michael Phelps recently reminded us of this when he broke a 2,100-year old record for the most individual Olympic titles, held previously by one of his Rhodes forebears.

To read the other 4 things the Olympics can teach us about trade policy from The Hill, please click HERE